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January - March 2013     VOLUME 17 ISSUE 1
 
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The Florida Crackers

Florida Crackers derived their name from the rugged 19th century pioneers who developed the territory now known as Florida. The first of these arrived in 1763 when Spain traded Florida to Great Britain. Lake BookFest will feature two of Lake County’s colorful and popular Cracker authors.

William H. Good is the author of By the Light of the Lighter Pine, A Cracker Collection of Short Stories about Natural Florida. His works promote environmental education and responsible and sustainable development and growth that extol the beauty and majesty of Florida's heritage and Natural environment. William is an entertaining storyteller and accomplished musician. His songs are written focusing on aspects of, and issues relating to Florida.

Captain Good founded the Lighter Pine Productions and Publishing which offers literary and multimedia materials and events. These materials and events promote environmental education and responsible and sustainable development and growth that extoll the beauty and majesty of Florida's heritage and Natural environment. The focus on sustainable communities addresses the need for community food security and the integration of multigenerational planning. No one needs to use limited natural resources toward their own, or others' extinction, nor use the varied values and needs to divide the generations.
 

Bob Lovell, author of Cracker Outlaw is a former five time mayor and nine time city commissioner of Leesburg, with a passion for his native Central Florida. He grew up in Pedro, which he says in his autobiography was “about 15 miles and 100 years from Ocala.” Raised mostly by an eccentric grandmother and surrounded by memories of his great-grandfather, a wounded Civil War veteran, Bob grew up in a world that was more typical of 19th than 20th century. His kinfolk, according to Lovell, were self-reliant, defiant and tenacious, as were most other Florida crackers of the time.

Cracker Outlaw is devoted to those early elementary-school days while he was growing up in the Pedro area just north of Lake County. Mr. Lovell reflects on the carefree days of hiking in the Gum Slough, exploring the sinkholes and caves of Central Florida and hunting and fishing in the Ocala National Forest. "By those who preferred town life, folks like the farmers in Pedro were known as feisty, uncivilized `crackers,' " Lovell writes.  Cracker is an old Anglo-Saxon term thought to have been adopted in the 1700s to describe nonconforming Southerners of Scot-Irish descent, according to the book.